BLAST Premier is going global

Recently BLAST Premier, one of the biggest CS:GO tournament organisers in the world, entered into a partnership with the Gaming Channel. The Gaming Channel is a TV channel based in Israel that is dedicated to fulltime coverage of gaming and esports content. This isn’t the first partnership that BLAST premier has made with a broadcaster this year and it is indicative of their rapid growth these past few months.

blast premier

The newest deal

Obviously, their newest deal is with the Israeli based Gaming Channel. The Gaming Channel is the first ever linear TV channel that only covers esports and gaming content. The channel was launched back in July of this year and if it was able to attract major players like BLAST Premier, they must be doing something right.

This new deal agreed between the two parties will bring BLAST Premier events and coverage to the region. Of course, anyone around the world can access BLAST Premier events online, however, they will have to contend with a language barrier. Not everyone is interested in watching English language casters and commentary. The deal with the Gaming Channel will give them the rights to broadcast BLAST Premier events in Hebrew within Israel.

The new deal is coming in pretty late in the year. They won’t be able to broadcast every event. However, they have inked this deal at a great time. BLAST Premier, like many other organisers, are planning a return to live LAN-based events. Hopefully, the excitement of a return to in-person play will bring in some new viewers.

Other deals

Back in April of this year, BLAST Premier signed a number of major broadcast deals across the globe. The countries included in that broadcast deal included Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania, Iceland, Canada, Kosovo, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, India and the Caribbean.

All of the broadcasters based in these countries got a similar deal to the one offered to the Gaming Channel in Israel. Each broadcaster would receive exclusive rights to broadcast events in their respective countries. Some, like Canada, would broadcast in English, while others would deal with their own casters and commentary in their native languages.

The interesting thing about these deals is that they are almost exclusively focused on terrestrial broadcasters. The focus is not on online streamers but rather on basic television. Honestly, this seems like a good idea for BLAST Premier.

Since they are one of the most popular tournament organisers for one of the most popular esports titles, they already have a secure grip on the online streaming market. However, an area that is lacking for the majority of esports events, is the general population that is less likely to google and more likely to channel surf.

According to BLAST Premier, they now broadcast to around 157 TV territories as well as offer content in over 18 different languages. This sort of reach is bound to attract new fans who might not have the initial interest to search for esports online. There could be plenty of folks who would never think of watching esports that could be converted to fans via terrestrial TV.

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